Uber, China, and Robots

Cynthia Estlund, What Should We Do After Work? Automation and Employment Law, NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 17-28, NYU Law and Economics Research Paper No. 17-26 (Jan. 5, 2018), available at SSRN. Charlotte S. Alexander Reams of law review pages have been written about the effects of technological change on employment law. The typical narrative tends to portray technology as a disruptor, changing the structure of work and challenging the assumptions on which our employment law regime is built. Scheduling software, for instance, enables employers to assign workers for last-minute shifts and send them home during slow periods, creating a form of wage and hour instability that was never contemplated by wage and hour law. App-based companies build their entire business models around workers they classify as independent contractors, and yet retain some measure of labor control, putting pressure on the legal definition of “employee.” Cynthia…

Read more detail on Recent Administrative Law posts –

This entry was posted in Administrative law and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply