Nicholson: Fighting and Victimhood in International Criminal Law

Joanna Nicholson (Univ. of Oslo – PluriCourts) has published Fighting and Victimhood in International Criminal Law (Routledge 2018). Here's the abstract: The act of fighting or being a fighter has certain consequences in international law. The most obvious example can be found in international humanitarian law, where a distinction is drawn between fighters and civilians, with fighters being military objectives and civilians being protected from attack. Another example is from international human rights law, where it has been held that the particular characteristics of military life have to be taken into account when interpreting the human rights of members of state armed forces. This volume focuses on the field of international criminal law and asks the question: what relevance does fighting have to victimhood in international criminal law? Among the topics which are explored are: how have international criminal courts and tribunals untangled lawful casualties of war from…

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