Category Archives: Medical malpractice law

West Virginia Medical Malpractice Lawsuit Laws in Jeopardy

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Sons Life Affected by Medical Negligence

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Illinois Surgical Error Lawsuit Filed After Carpal Tunnel Procedure

This week the Madison St. Clair-Record reported on the filing of a new Illinois medical malpractice lawsuit following claims by a former patient that a surgical error caused her serious harm. The victimized patient who filed the suit claims that she visited the surgeon in November of 2009 to have a carpal tunnel procedure performed on her right hand. These procedures are particularly common for those who suffer from the syndrome which puts pressure on the nerve in the wrist which supplies feeling and movement to other parts in the hand. When left untreated, carpal tunnel can cause significant nerve damage, permanent hand weakness, and severe numbness. The carpal tunnel release surgery involves cutting into the ligament that is causing the pressure on the nerve to provide relief to the hand. However, the woman in this case claims that carpal tunnel release operation was botched. Specifically, she states in court filings that her surgeon cut her ulner nerve during the procedure and failed to fix the damage. As a result of this mistake, the woman claims that she now has a clawing of the hand, nerve damage, and loss control of the hand. Upon finally realizing the problem, the victim filed this Illinois medical malpractice lawsuit seeking to hold the doctor and the neurological medical center involved accountable for their mistake. It is hard to underestimate the way that these Illinois medical errors affect the lives of the victims. Even mistakes such as this one which appear only to affect a small part of the body, could have significant ramifications on the individual's life. Use of a hand is vital for the performance of basic and household tasks. When a botched procedure causes problems with the hand, the victim's entire life could be affected. Work might be missed, medical bills would mount, basic home care tasks would be impossible, and similar problems would accrue. When looked at in that light, it is easy to see how the victims would seek out basic accountability and redress so that they could make themselves whole and be compensated for the losses that should have been prevented. Our Chicago personal injury attorneys work with victims throughout the state who have been similarly hurt. We have experience on all forms of medical malpractice cases, including those involving surgical mistakes. When a patient goes "under the knife" it is imperative that the medical professionals involved not make mistakes that leave a patient worse off than before they went in for the procedure to begin with. If that mistake is made, then it is necessary for the negligent professional to be held accountable for their error. If you or someone you know is in this situation, please contact an experienced legal professional to share your story and learn what can be done to help. Timing matters in these situations, so it is advisable not to delay in visiting the legal professional. Statutes of limitation require the victim to official file suit a set amount of time after the neglect occurs. Considering that it takes some time to properly prepare for the filing of a lawsuit, there is benefit to talking with legal counsel as soon as feasible. See Our Related Blog Posts: Medical Malpractice Deaths Could Have Been Avoided if Doctors Washed Their Hands Too Much Noise in Operating Rooms Increase Surgical Errors.. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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The FDA and the Saga of Multaq – When is enough, enough?

There are growing safety concerns over the anti-arrhythmia drug Multaq, (dronedarone), which is manufactured and marketed by Sanofi-Aventis and has generated a great deal of controversy and concern in just a few short years. Multaq was first approved by the Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) in 2009 for use as an anti-arrhythmic drug in heart patients with paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation... To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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House Hearing on Food Marketing to Kids — Seller Beware

Two subcommittees of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, the Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade and the Subcommittee on Health, held a joint hearing last week on the issue of "Food Marketing: Can 'Voluntary' Government Restrictions Improve Children's Health?" Speakers came from the CDC, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the FTC, Campbell Soup Company, and the Association of National Advertisers. The background of the hearing is that the 2009 Consolidated Appropriations Act contained report language forming an Interagency Working Group (IWG), comprised of the Federal Trade Commission, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Agriculture. The IWG was tasked with conducting a study and issuing a report to Congress concerning standards for marketing food to children. Instead of conducting the prescribed study or providing a report to Congress, the IWG issued a document entitled "Preliminary Proposed Nutrition Principles to Guide Industry Self-Regulatory Efforts." The document presented a a sweeping set of "voluntary" principles for marketing foods to kids, based on nutritional standards that exceed and conflict with those of other government programs. They also reflect a tenuous grasp of science, lacking evidence, critics say, showing that childhood obesity is related to advertising of food that doesn't comply with the proposed principles. The guidelines are so restrictive that many healthy foods, like low-fat yogurts, whole wheat bread, and 2% milk could not be marketed to those 17 and under. Even non-sweetened cereals would not meet the IWG guidelines. According to one analysis, 88 out of the 100 most advertised foods and drinks would be in violation of these standards. Regardless of whether a child sees a commercial for an item, the ultimate purchasing decision rests with the parent who purchases the groceries – and those groceries carry nutrition labels that every parent can read. Of course, this is the nanny state rearing its head again. And there are serious issues of infringement of constitutionally protected commercial speech. But a legitimate concern to our readers is that while these guidelines are labeled as voluntary, what happens when a litigious group sues a food manufacturer because it showed a commercial advertising a new kind of chocolate treat or drink that does not comply? Our readers are surely familiar with example of courts allowing plaintiff experts to note "voluntary" or "recommended" guidelines... To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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