Category Archives: Legal Ethics

Multi-tasking and Malpractice

In this e-world, clients want answers fast and I often see lawyers juggling tasks — attending a deposition while using their smartphones to deal with some other question or problem. I have always believed that, for me personally, multi-tasking increased the error rate, and I've seen indications of that in the work of others, especially students who think they can attend class and bid on new shoes at the same time. The book The Shallows was a good read on how most of us were not made for multi-tasking. A new study is out that concludes that for multi-taskers, "if performance is measured with accuracy of results, the relation is a downward slopping line, in which increased levels of multitasking lead to a significant loss in accuracy." Rachel Adler, Raquel Benbunan-Fich, Juggling on a High Wire: Multitasking Effects on Performance. The study is available, for purchase, here... To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

Posted in Legal Ethics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

QualitySolicitors kiosks in London's WHSmith stores: a glimpse into the future for US legal services delivery?

Today's New York Times features a look at the legal access points placed by QualitySolicitors in numerous London WHSmith stores this fall, a sign that the UK's Legal Services Act has gone into full effect. The NYT article "Selling Pieces of Law Firms to Investors," which quotes LEF's Andy Perlman, is here. In my paper Democratizing the Delivery of Legal Services, I suggest corporations and individuals hold important First Amendment interests in arrangements like this that make legal representation more accessible. It will be interesting to see how the ABA 20/20 Commission responds as it considers possible reform of Model Rule 5.4 to permit similar activity in the US. I'm also following closely the Jacoby & Meyers litigation challenging Rule 5.4 in Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York. Oral argument on a motion to dismiss is scheduled for this coming Thursday in the Southern District of New York. .. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

Posted in Legal Ethics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Resisting Arrest, Accepting Treatment

The South Carolina Supreme Court has imposed a public reprimand with conditions for the following misconduct: In July 2007, respondent was arrested following an altercation with police officers at a bar. In July 2011, respondent pled guilty to resisting arrest….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

Posted in Legal Ethics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

We Want It For Free

The internet has become the place where folks go in search for free stuff. We used to pay for newspapers. Now we get news free on Google news or MSNBC online. We used to pay subscription fees for forums like AOL. Today, it would be heresy to charge for Facebook or Twitter. We used to pay to rent movies. Now, we can download shows and movies for free on Hulu. Even when we pay subscriptions for unlimited movies, we complain about the monthly fee. We can watch music videos on Youtube, communicate on Skype, and send "mail" via e-mail, all for free. As consumers, we have grown accustomed to getting more and more services for free. When marketing your practice, you have to keep in mind that the average consumer has become acclimated to expect more for less. And so when dealing with potential clients understand that they are more than ever, looking for value, because they've received so much in their social pursuits for so little. Keep those expectations in mind, and possibly use them to your advantage by offering free information online through your website or blog and possibly free downloadable e-books, apps, or webinars. This growing sense of entitlement affects us all, and you should keep it in mind when meeting client expectations. Share this: Twitter LinkedIn Email Digg Reddit StumbleUpon Facebook Like this: Be the first to like this post... To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

Posted in Legal Ethics | Tagged , | 1 Comment

MIT School of Law?

My MSU Law colleague Dan Katz has unveiled an intriguing proposal for addressing the economic pressures and technology changes underway in the legal profession–The MIT School of Law: A Perspective on Legal Education in the 21st Century. Check out slides about his MIT School of Law proposal here posted at his blog home, Computational Legal Studies. Katz argues that one way for legal education to remain relevant is to train future lawyers in quantitative methods, information engineering, supply chain management, and technology (check out slide #157 for a sample curriculum). In other words, he says, "yes, there is going to be math on the exam.".. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

Posted in Legal Ethics | Tagged | Leave a comment