Category Archives: Law Students

Nature Versus Nurture in the Propensity to Innovate

A colleague pointed me to a paper today that I wanted to share. NBER researchers have managed to tie patent inventor data to tax returns to test scores in order to show who is likely to be an inventor on a patent. The study makes some intuitive and nonintuitive findings. The paper, by Alexander M. Bell (Harvard Econ), Raj Chetty (Stanford Econ), Xavier Jaravel (LSE), Neviana Petkova (U.S. Treasury), and John Van Reenen (MIT Econ), is here:We characterize the factors that determine who becomes an inventor in America by using de-identified data on 1.2 million inventors from patent records linked to tax records. We establish three sets of results. First, children from high-income (top 1%) families are ten times as likely to become inventors as those from below-median income families. There are similarly large gaps by race and gender. Differences in innate ability, as measured by test scores in early childhood, explain relatively little of these gaps. Second, exposure to innovation….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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How do you ask for a letter of recommendation?

I’d like to provide some advice on letters of recommendation, having requested many for myself and with some observations having just provided one. When requesting a letter of recommendation, choose someone who can speak to the skills and attributes you’re trying to highlight. In my experience, a glowing letter from someone less well known is better than a measured letter from a famous person. Make it as little work as possible for the person writing the letter. Tell them why you’re asking them, including the experiences and skills you’d like them to highlight – and even offer to write a draft if they’d like. People are busy. Here’s what an outline for a letter of recommendation should look like: The Introduction: How you know this person and how strongly I recommend them. The Body: Three paragraphs with an introductory sentence specifying a skill or attribute, an example of how you saw that person employ that particular skill or….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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Take action now – #MakeTheCase for legal education!

The House of Representatives released its Higher Education Act (HEA) reauthorization bill this past Friday, and it proposes to modify or eliminate several federal financial aid programs – changes which would directly and negatively affect law students. These proposals include: Lowering the cap on Grad PLUS Loans Eliminating Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Effectively eliminating income-based loan forgiveness Law students rely heavily on federal loans. Studies have shown that between 80 and 90 percent have at least one. So, these changes could directly impact the majority of you. If enacted, the bill will lower the cap graduate student loans to $28,500, irrespective of schools’ listed costs of attendance. This will force many students to borrow from private sector lenders to attend law school, returning the nation to an environment where many low- and middle-income individuals will be unable to obtain a student loan under reasonable terms, or even….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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When is a Motion to Compel in Patent Litigation Too Broad? Proportionality and Pharmaceuticals: A Battle of Titans

Author: Thomas J Patania   Case Citation: Gilead Scis., Inc. v. Merck & Co., No. 5:13-cv-04057-BLF, 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5616 (N.D. Cal. January 13, 2016).   Employee/Personnel/Employer Implicated: Outside Counsel   eLesson Learned: When a party seeking discovery already has information regarding a patent in question, but refuses to take the opposing party at its word, […].. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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These two dudes owned some steamboats, their suit did SCOTUS quell (Gibbons v. Ogden)

This is the latest in a series of Quimbee.com case brief videos. Have you signed up for your Quimbee membership? The American Bar Association offers three months of Quimbee study aids (a $72 value) for law student members. And if you go Premium, you’ll receive Quimbee Legal Ethics Outline (a $29 value) as part of our Premium Legal Ethics Bundle. Ready to go all in? Go Platinum and get 3 years of unlimited access to Quimbee and 3 years of ABA Premium membership (nearly a $1,000 value) for just $499. What started as a case of petty revenge turned into competition on the public waterways, and then became the first Commerce Clause case in Supreme Court history. The facts that gave rise to Gibbons v. Ogden, 22 U.S. 1 (1824), ostensibly involve a battle between two steamboat operators, Aaron Ogden and Thomas Gibbons. But it all began when Ogden counseled Gibbons’s wife in divorce proceedings. Ogden then had Gibbons arrested for….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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