Juries and Emerging Democracies

Brent T. White, Putting Aside the Rule of Law Myth: Corruption and the Case for Juries in Emerging Democracies, 43 Cornell Int’l L.J. 307 (2010), available at SSRN. Suja A.

Thomas One prevailing idea is that democracy, which fosters economic development, requires the rule of law. In other words, the rule of law will remedy the economic woes of emerging democracies. Another prevailing idea is that juries are antithetical to the rule of law. Because foreign companies are less likely to invest in a country with juries, which do not follow the law, emerging democracies should not establish juries. Brent White boldly questions both of these ideas in his article Putting Aside the Rule of Law Myth: Corruption and the Case for Juries in Emerging Democracies. White’s proposal comes at a time in the United States-the country with the most extensive jury trial right-when juries are in decline, with jury trials occurring in approximately only 2% of criminal cases and 1% of civil cases. So, you might ask, if juries do not seem necessary in an established democracy, why should juries be the answer in emerging democracies? Continue reading “Juries and Emerging Democracies”

Read more detail on Recent Constitutional Law Posts –

Related news:

This entry was posted in Constitutional Law and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply