Category Archives: Immigration law

Outlining Georgia Uninsured or Underinsured Motorists Law

Drivers who are injured in car accidents in Georgia typically make a claim against the at-fault driver which is paid for by his or her insurance company. But what happens if the at-fault driver has no insurance or you are injured by a hit-and-run driver? That’s where Georgia’s uninsured or underinsured motorists law becomes relevant. Under the uninsured or underinsured (UM/UIM) law, you can use your own insurance coverage to meet your costs, if you have purchased the additional coverage. Georgia uninsured and underinsurance motorist law is a complicated area. A car accident injury lawyer can help you navigate the minefield. Georgia’s Underinsured Motorists Law About 10 percent of drivers allow their insurance coverage to expire or don’t have it in Georgia, even though there are statutory minimums that drivers should purchase. In Georgia, drivers must carry liability coverage at the following levels. $25,000 per person for bodily injury $50,000 per….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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From the Bookshelves: Illegal, A Graphic Novel by Eoin Colfer & Andrew Donkin

A recent trip to my local Barnes & Noble with my kids led me to discover Illegal: A Graphic Novel Depicting One Boy's Epic Journey to Europe, by Eoin Colfer (of the Artemis Fowl series) and Andrew Donkin. It tells….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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Denaturalization Task Force Coming Next Year

Beginning next year, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will launch a task force located in Los Angeles, designed to identify, detect, and prosecute individuals who have fraudulently gained United States Citizenship, for example by entering into a ‘sham’ marriage to obtain permanent residence, or engaging in other fraudulent activity, such as using a false identity to apply for permanent residence and/or naturalization. USCIS has already begun to process of hiring lawyers and immigration officers who will review cases of individuals who have been deported, who the agency believes may potentially use a false identity to obtain permanent residence and/or citizenship. Such cases will be referred to the Department of Justice, who will then initiate the removal of individuals who have committed immigration fraud. Of the denaturalization task force, USCIS Director L. Francis Cissna told reporters, “We finally have a process in place to….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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Published Decision From the Court of Appeal of California, First Appellate District, Division Two, Regarding Penal Code section 1473.7

I now have my first published decision. People v. Morales (2018) 25 Cal.App.5th 502. The case came out of San Mateo County Superior Court and involved the statutory interpretation of Penal Code section 1473.7, specifically when a motion to vacate could be raised in the trial court. The judge held the language of the statute necessitated that a final order of removal be established or a notice to appear in deportation proceedings. The court of appeal ruled for appellant that such a reading was too restrictive and not the intent of the Legislature. A brief summary of the case is as follows: In 2002, Morales pleaded no contest to a drug offense. He served his sentence, voluntarily departed the U.S., and reentered the country. In 2017, while residing in the U.S., he moved to vacate this conviction under the newly enacted Penal Code section 1473.71, hoping to obtain legal status via a “U visa.” Morales contended that but for his conviction, his assistance in a 2009….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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How Does The U-Visa Process Work?

A U-Visa is a United States non-immigrant visa that is available for victims of certain crimes, as well as their family members. If the individual qualifies for the U-Visa, it can be a way for that person to obtain legal permanent residency status, otherwise known as a green card, and eventually U.S. citizenship. However, it is important to understand what the qualifications are for a U-Visa and what certain issues may present themselves along the way. What Are the Qualifications to Receive a U-Visa? To qualify for a U-Visa, the following requirements must be met: The individual must have been a victim of a crime that falls within one of the designated crimes under the U-Visa program; The individual must have suffered “substantial physical or mental harm” as a direct result of the crime; The victim has information about the crime committed; The individual was helpful and assisted in the investigation of the crime; The crime occurred in the United States or violated….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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