Category Archives: Technology & Cyberlaw

Dear Canada: Accessing Publicly Available Information on the Internet Is Not a Crime

Canadian authorities should drop charges against a 19-year-old Canadian accused of “unauthorized use of a computer service” for downloading thousands of public records hosted and available to all on a government website. The whole episode is an embarrassing overreach that chills the right of access to public records and threatens important security research. At the heart of the incident, as reported by CBC news this week, is the Nova Scotian government’s embarrassment over its own failure to protect the sensitive data of 250 people who used the province’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to request their own government files. These documents were hosted on the government web server that also hosted public records containing no personal information. Every request hosted on the server contained very similar URLs, which differed only in a single document ID number at the end of the URL. The teenager took a known ID number, and then, by modifying….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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Conference on IP Enforcement at Trade Shows, UNLV, October 4, 2018 (Guest Blog Post)

by guest blogger Marketa Trimble The practice of IP law fascinates IP law enthusiasts, and it can be stimulating for others as well. The practice has even been considered exciting enough for IP lawyers to be portrayed in a sophisticated beer ad and a feature film. Recently, real IP lawyers appeared in an entertaining yet educational trademark-related video (although apparently IP lawyers were used only as background extras). Among the many roles played by IP lawyers, one stands out as particularly action-packed: protecting and enforcing IP rights at trade shows. A 2016 Bloomberg video report illustrates the IP action that might take place at a trade show; the video shows U.S. federal marshals enforcing a temporary restraining order (“TRO”) issued against a Chinese exhibitor at CES in Las Vegas. IP rights owners such as the California startup in the report request TROs for trade shows because the shows provide infringing products wide exposure to large….. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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Bitcoin heist suspect reportedly walked out of low-security prison, onto flight

Enlarge / The view taking off from Keflavik International Airport. (credit: Eric Salard / Flickr) One of the suspects arrested in Iceland’s "Big Bitcoin Heist" has reportedly fled the country for Sweden. According to the Associated Press, Sindri Thor Stefansson likely left a "low-security prison" in the southern region of the country on Wednesday. He then apparently made his way to the Keflavik International Airport and boarded a flight bound for Stockholm. Coincidentally, Iceland’s prime minister, Katrín Jakobsdóttir, was also on the very same flight. Stefansson, who was one of 11 suspects arrested over the recent theft of 600 bitcoin-mining computers, likely did not have to show a passport in order to board his flight as Iceland is part of the European passport-free Schengen zone. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments.. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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This isn’t the first time a tech boom has interfered with democracy

Ars Technica Live #21, featuring economist Bradford DeLong and Ars editor-at-large Annalee Newitz. Filmed by Chris Schodt, produced by Justin Wolfson. (video link) Last week, we had lots of questions about the fate of democracy in a world where the Internet feeds us propaganda faster than we can fact check it. Luckily, Ars Technica Live featured guest Bradford DeLong, an economist who has spent his career studying tech and industrial revolutions, as well as the connections between economics and democracy. So we had a lot to discuss, and the result is the longest Ars Technica Live episode ever. Brad worked in the US Treasury department during the Clinton administration, and he's a professor at UC Berkeley. So he's familiar with economic theory and history, as well as what happens when the rubber meets the road in trade agreements, regulations, and policy. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments.. To continue reading this legal news please click Read full information...

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